The Grapes of Wrath

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Wolves
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The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Wolves » Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:58 pm

It was interesting....I just finished reading the "Grapes of Wrath" for the first time
in my life. I thought lots of the things that were presented in the book were
very similar to what is going on now.

The greed of the CEO's of the world were very much like the landowners in the story.
It was quite ironic.

The last couple paragraphs of the book just kind of grossed me out after a pretty good
story.

That's it...on to the next classic.



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Sputnik
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Sputnik » Wed Jan 07, 2009 12:40 am

Wolves wrote:It was interesting....I just finished reading the "Grapes of Wrath" for the first time
in my life. I thought lots of the things that were presented in the book were
very similar to what is going on now.

The greed of the CEO's of the world were very much like the landowners in the story.
It was quite ironic.

The last couple paragraphs of the book just kind of grossed me out after a pretty good
story.

That's it...on to the next classic.

[font=Century Gothic]You are absitively and posolutly right.
Greed never changes.[/font]

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Wolves
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Wolves » Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:13 am

Sputnik wrote:[font=Century Gothic]You are absitively and posolutly right.
Greed never changes.[/font]



I am glad you agree.
Oching Hotashow...my best Russian to English Translation.

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Parrotpaul
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Parrotpaul » Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:19 am

Wolves wrote:
The last couple paragraphs of the book just kind of grossed me out after a pretty good
story.

Really? That was the most pignant and moving part of the whole novel, IMO.
"I think I may say that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education." John Locke

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Wolves
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Wolves » Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:30 am

Parrotpaul wrote:Really? That was the most pignant and moving part of the whole novel, IMO.


I agree. It was very moving...but kind of sick at the same time.
Who names their kid Rose of Sharon?
I guess you have to do what you have to do to survive. I am sure the old man enjoyed it.

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Parrotpaul
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Parrotpaul » Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:44 am

Wolves wrote:
I agree. It was very moving...but kind of sick at the same time.
Who names their kid Rose of Sharon?
I guess you have to do what you have to do to survive. I am sure the old man enjoyed it.
Enjoyed it? She kept him alive, and she moved from being a whining naive young girl to become a mature woman capable of giving and showing deep concern for others less fortunate than herself...even though it seemed impossible that at that point in the novel anyone could be more desperate. The religious imagery in that novel is also profound...if you recall the Pieta, you might better understand just how far Rose of Sharon had grown.
"I think I may say that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education." John Locke

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John Q. Public
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby John Q. Public » Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:52 am

Wolves wrote:Who names their kid Rose of Sharon?

They were going to name her Hibiscus. Better that they went with the common name.

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Wolves
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Wolves » Wed Jan 07, 2009 10:12 am

Parrotpaul wrote:Enjoyed it? She kept him alive, and she moved from being a whining naive young girl to become a mature woman capable of giving and showing deep concern for others less fortunate than herself...even though it seemed impossible that at that point in the novel anyone could be more desperate. The religious imagery in that novel is also profound...if you recall the Pieta, you might better understand just how far Rose of Sharon had grown.


I agree with all your points. You are a much deeper thinker than I.
We assume it kept him alive for another day or two.
I don't know what the Pieta is....what is that?

I think MA was my favorite character. Although I would like to be like Uncle John.

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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby grayghost » Wed Jan 07, 2009 9:39 pm

John Q. Public wrote:They were going to name her Hibiscus. Better that they went with the common name.


Rose of Sharon is in the "Hibiscus" family. The difference is that "Rose of Sharon" is a deciduous Hibiscus that will take the freeze here in the North State.The Hibiscus,planted in the South State, will not survive here.

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ND7
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby ND7 » Wed Jan 07, 2009 10:48 pm

Wolves wrote:
I agree with all your points. You are a much deeper thinker than I.
We assume it kept him alive for another day or two.
I don't know what the Pieta is....what is that?

I think MA was my favorite character. Although I would like to be like Uncle John.

Wolves.....The Pieta.

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"What matters is not that it's true, but that I believe it; or no, not that I believe it, but that I believe it....I trust I make myself obscure."
St. Thomas More, A Man for All Seasons.

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Wolves
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Wolves » Thu Jan 08, 2009 8:31 am

Thanks ND7.

Never heard of that before. They don't teach us Presbyterians much.

I am becoming a Hemingway and Steinbeck expert! Although I don't know if I spelled
their names right.

I kind of liked the way the Jode's took care of business.
Tom just whacks guys when they give him a problem.

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Wolves
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Wolves » Thu Jan 08, 2009 8:32 am

grayghost wrote:
Rose of Sharon is in the "Hibiscus" family. The difference is that "Rose of Sharon" is a deciduous Hibiscus that will take the freeze here in the North State.The Hibiscus,planted in the South State, will not survive here.


I didn't know Rose of Sharon was a plant.
I am just learning more and more from this board everyday!!!

Thanks Mr. Ghost

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Parrotpaul
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Parrotpaul » Thu Jan 08, 2009 8:37 am

Wolves wrote:Thanks ND7.

Never heard of that before. They don't teach us Presbyterians much.

I am becoming a Hemingway and Steinbeck expert! Although I don't know if I spelled
their names right.

I kind of liked the way the Jode's took care of business.
Tom just whacks guys when they give him a problem.
If you want to get to the heart of Steinbeck, you will need to read CANNERY ROW. You'll love it. It's short..a novella.

TORTILLA FLAT is another good read.

NB....the Pieta is a piece by Michelangelo.
"I think I may say that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education." John Locke

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Wolves
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Re: The Grapes of Wrath

Postby Wolves » Thu Jan 08, 2009 5:20 pm

Parrotpaul wrote:If you want to get to the heart of Steinbeck, you will need to read CANNERY ROW. You'll love it. It's short..a novella.

TORTILLA FLAT is another good read.

NB....the Pieta is a piece by Michelangelo.


I am all over both of those. Had Tortilla Flat in my hand yesterday before opting for
a John Grisham book.

I just got done with Old Man and the Sea....great stuff........."FISH"

They just don't make Movie Trailers like they used to....http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1kTh7cXylM

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