Rosa californica

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John Q. Public
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Rosa californica

Postby John Q. Public » Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:09 pm

[img=float-right]http://www.occonnect.com/community/gallery/image.php?mode=medium&album_id=22&image_id=168[/img]I got one of these to add to my xeriscape a while back but didn't get around to planting it. So I googled to refresh myself on how big it gets. Read the description to the end.

California Rose is a deciduous shrub with 1-2" pink flowers that is the wild rose of much of California. . This wild rose has fragrant 3/4" red smooth fragrant hips. The hips are of good quality for tea. The wild rose in many roadside spots up and down the coast ranges in California and Oregon. In the transverse ranges around Frazier Park . You'll find this wild rose in shade to part shade in the interior. At higher elevations(up to 6000'+) or near the coast sun is preferred. Like most wild roses this California one tolerates some drought but likes moisture. California wild rose will usually grow in some source of moisture. An upright grower, forms thickets on north slopes and next to streams. A very important wildlife plant. If you are in an area of feral cats or wild dogs this plant should help. Its thorns are hooked. You do not walk through it. It is like thorny velcro. The cats may be able to walk under it but not get animals that are hiding in it. Low life neighbors hate it, they can no longer siphon gas to get to town, without going in the front way.


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Parrotpaul
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Wed Jan 29, 2014 8:31 am

Here is a part of my xeriscape ......started this in December 2010. All these areas look much better in the sunshine. :cheers:

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I dug up my rose garden three weeks ago, and I made another xeriscape landscape.....raised beds...Majosa rubble rock...lots of topsoil generously cut with cactus soil, and I used plants I already had....there is a Hula Girl Plumeria on the right side in the middle. I put that in the ground (dry) about three weeks ago...I'm keeping my fingers crossed....it is to be the showcase tree. Beautiful red flowers....exotic fragrance.

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I built this last summer for a neighbor.

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Re: Rosa californica

Postby John Q. Public » Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:00 am

Yours look a lot better than mine. Mine is mostly planted but it's still mostly dirt. It will look better when everything starts growing. Mine is mostly just low-water bushes - salvias, lavender, lemon grass, an old yucca, a red bird of paradise (spectacular looking plant. Crossing my fingers on if it likes the soil, though.), a pomegranate, a few others, and a Rosa Californica for the corner that the lowlife flyer passer-outers cut through. So far it's about a quarter of the front yard but I might expand it. I'm just trying to cut my water bill down and not have so much lawn to cut. It's amazing how many good looking plants there are that don't require that much water - even some that you don't need to water at all.

Nice fire sticks! We have a couple in pots but they sort of migrated to shady, sheltered spots so they weren't all that colorful this year. Maybe I'll find a spot for one of them out in front, too. It might like it better.
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:10 am

The Bird OP plants will do well in dry soil and full sun....huge bulbous root system. Firestick cuttings root and grow quickly. Once they acclimate to the ground....like instantly...they are pretty drought proof, and the color they add with zero care and clean-up is worthy of my devotion. I cut everything with at least 70% cactus soil or more. I have turned off all the irrigators, but the PCM landscapers keep turning them back on. It does no good to tell them I don't need the water. They protest they have a job to do periodically making sure the irrigation works....they turn it back on...I turn it back off.
"I think I may say that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education." John Locke

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Re: Rosa californica

Postby John Q. Public » Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:37 am

I got tired of my neighbors watering the Bougainvillea From Hell, so I climbed over the fence and capped their sprinklers. They had no way of knowing without chopping their way through it with a machete and the plant didn't care. It just didn't grow quite so fast.

Not a Bird of Paradise; a Red Bird of Paradise. Different plant.

I'd also like to find a place for one of these. They're pretty and amusing, both at the same time. The flowers look like fried eggs. And it's native.

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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Wed Jan 29, 2014 12:04 pm

This project is on hold...my downstairs neighbor had a leak that necessitated rerouting some water pipes. In order to get to the area so they could work, they cut down a large shrub that sat where the block raised bed now sits. I asked the landscape guy if I could replant the area, and they wouldn't have to bother. He liked the idea, and I copped a few more square feet of prime CA garden area...gratis. :)

They have finished the piping, and now they need to re-stucco, paint, and be gone.

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I'm going to try to dig out this agave and put it in the raised bed. These things can be lethal to muscle around...you need goggles and plenty of big thick towels.

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Parrotpaul
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:16 am

Are there no gardeners out there who want to talk about gardens and plants?
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Bubba#35 » Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:54 am

I enjoy planting and growing flowers in the spring and summer. Not so much in the fall and winter. Mostly container gardening. I'm not a big succulent fan but with our rainfall problems I might be forced in that direction.

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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:34 pm

I never was much of a succulent fan until recently....now I have them all over the place...easy to propagate and easy to care for.
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Bubba#35 » Sat Feb 01, 2014 2:20 pm

They are easy to take care of, I have a hanging basket in the entry way. I'm just not a fan of their appearance. Not enough color.

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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Sat Feb 01, 2014 3:18 pm

Most of them will send up some kind of flower if you give them sunlight and water. I find that to be the case for in ground succulents. They don't need a whole lot of direct sun, but they do like sun/bright shady areas and will flower for you maybe two times a year.
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Bubba#35 » Sat Feb 01, 2014 3:24 pm

I'm aware of the blooms but the variation in color now available in other flowering plants are so great that, at least to me, succulents are left in the dust.

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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Sat Feb 01, 2014 3:32 pm

I'm hearing that. Cactus is my fav, and I also have about 30 potted desert roses which are terrific bloomers (they are also succulents...adenium obesum) as well as regular roses and plumeria. My regular cactus reward me every spring with terrific cactus flowers.

People are either with succulents or not...there doesn't seem to be an in between.
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby John Q. Public » Sat Feb 01, 2014 5:31 pm

Thanks for reminding me to move my epiphyllum. Got it a couple years ago, had it on the patio, it never bloomed, FB stuck it off in a corner and we forgot about it. I just went out and rescued it and it has a bud on it! Cool! Apparently it likes being ignored.

We have a few flower beds scattered around but I prefer stuff you can eat. We have the room, might as well grow some food. Mainly tomatoes and peppers in the vegetable garden. We don't bother with cabbage or onions or anything that's cheap in the stores. No point.

And we planted a bunch of fruit trees in the last few years. We usually have more limes and peaches than we know what to do with. And we have a couple dwarf apple trees, a plum, a blood orange, a tangerine, a nectarine, a couple very young avocados and just for the helluvit, an almond. And a Zinfandel vine. Not the best table grape but what the hey. They're sweet but they have hard seeds.

Funny thing I've been noticing around the hood is people planting fruit trees either out by the sidewalk or in their parking strips. The people down the street have a small orchard in their parking strip. You want a peach? Take one. Just keep your hands off the mangoes and guavas. They're a little possessive about those.
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Sat Feb 01, 2014 5:45 pm

I have a Persian lime and a Meyer's lemon. I gave up trying to grow veggies in Maine....insects worked against me. Out here we can't grow veggies in the Village...except in the dedicated garden lots.
"I think I may say that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education." John Locke

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Re: Rosa californica

Postby Parrotpaul » Sun Feb 02, 2014 6:22 am

It's cold out there this morning...well, a chilly 40. I have rose bushes that are starting to leaf out already, and the growth has been significant the past month on my lime tree....the plumeria branch ends are swelling, and it looks to be an early flowering season all around. The soil is really workable and easy. Terrific gardening weather. :cheers: GO BRONCOS!!!!!
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby John Q. Public » Wed Aug 13, 2014 9:06 pm

Update on my posts here:

The tomatoes haven't grown this year like they have in the last few years. We still get plenty but we haven't been buried in them. Gotta add more stuff to the soil next year. The apple and peach crops were light but tasty and we still haven't seen any fruit from the blood orange or tangerine trees. I'm starting to wonder if they're male. The nectarine is late, as usual, and I guess the plum is still too young.

The Zinfandel vine made about 10 big clusters of outstanding grapes and it's still going. Very sweet and very tasty and the seeds aren't as annoying as most. I'm very pleasantly surprised with my "what the hell" purchase. And the Foreign babe brought home a mystery guava of some kind and a dragonfruit plant a couple weeks ago. Not an exciting fruit - not all that sweet or flavorful but it's pulp is bright magenta and about the consistency of kiwi fruit. It's great for adding color to a fruit salad.

And my Red Bird of Paradise finally bloomed! I guess it didn't like being transplanted last year and it grew very slowly until a few weeks ago. Now it's doing fine but it's only about 3' tall. Hopefully it will be closer to 6' next year. Here's a blurry picture of what it should look like and a closer shot of the flowers on mine. Yeah, I know the lawn needs mowing. And the car needs washing.

RBOP1.jpg


RBOP2.jpg
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Re: Rosa californica

Postby John Q. Public » Wed Aug 13, 2014 10:35 pm

Oh. Right. I almost forgot. Chilis!

The ghost chili plant has about 20 or 30 chilis starting to turn red. I don't know what to do with them again this year because we've hardly put a dent in last year's hot sauce. It isn't that we haven't used any, it's that you use it by the drop. One drop will turn a bowl of soup spicy, 3 drops makes it hot, 5 drops and you'd better have a box of Kleenex handy.

I also picked up a white jalapeno plant (interesting. They're little, fiery and, yes, they're white) and a NuMex Suave Orange chili at Cal Poly. It's a brand new, mild Habanero. It's about as hot as a peperoncini but it looks and tastes like a Habanero. Recommended if you've ever wondered what they actually taste like, other than pain.
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