New Estimate for Alien Earths: 2 Billion in Our Galaxy Alone

Space, the environment, new discoveries and new uses for old ones
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kramer
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New Estimate for Alien Earths: 2 Billion in Our Galaxy Alone

Post by kramer » Thu Mar 24, 2011 1:26 pm

New study: Approximetly 1 out of every 37 to 70 sunlike stars in our galaxy might harbor an alien Earth.

http://www.space.com/11188-alien-earths ... stars.html
“We should have been warned by the CFC/ozone affair because the corruption of science in that was so bad that something like 80% of the measurements being made during that time were either faked, or incompetently done.”

- Scientist James Lovelock

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GOODave
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Re: New Estimate for Alien Earths: 2 Billion in Our Galaxy A

Post by GOODave » Thu Mar 24, 2011 4:58 pm

kramer wrote:New study: Approximetly 1 out of every 37 to 70 sunlike stars in our galaxy might harbor an alien Earth.

http://www.space.com/11188-alien-earths ... stars.html
Sort of related: I'm in the middle of the book Heaven, by Randy Alcorn.

He just posited (without much Scriptural support ... which he also acknowledged) that it is entirely possible that those of us going to Heaven will ... or actually "could" ... conceivably be placed in charge of "other" planets. Most of it was conjecture, of course, but interesting that I then come in here and find this thread.

O.K., back to the topic: Didn't intend to divert.

I wonder if anyone is considering some sort of research to find them and/or eventually travel to one or more of them (or if that is even possible).

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kramer
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Re: New Estimate for Alien Earths: 2 Billion in Our Galaxy A

Post by kramer » Fri Mar 25, 2011 3:03 pm

GOODave wrote: Sort of related: I'm in the middle of the book Heaven, by Randy Alcorn.

He just posited (without much Scriptural support ... which he also acknowledged) that it is entirely possible that those of us going to Heaven will ... or actually "could" ... conceivably be placed in charge of "other" planets. Most of it was conjecture, of course, but interesting that I then come in here and find this thread.

O.K., back to the topic: Didn't intend to divert.

I wonder if anyone is considering some sort of research to find them and/or eventually travel to one or more of them (or if that is even possible).
We are looking for other planets, as far as traveling to them, probably never happen.
“We should have been warned by the CFC/ozone affair because the corruption of science in that was so bad that something like 80% of the measurements being made during that time were either faked, or incompetently done.”

- Scientist James Lovelock

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GOODave
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Re: New Estimate for Alien Earths: 2 Billion in Our Galaxy A

Post by GOODave » Sat Mar 26, 2011 7:46 am

kramer wrote:
We are looking for other planets, as far as traveling to them, probably never happen.
I just read the story on Yahoo about NASA shutting down the Stardust (Comet - searching) space craft. It had fulfilled its mission after being up there for 12 years so they burned off the rest of its fuel and flipped the switch.

It's not shutting down immediately but without the fuel, it can't make little corrections to keep the Solar panels aimed towards the sun so eventually, its batteries will run out and it will simply be another satellite orbiting the Sun.

I found a couple of the comments particularly interesting:
Launched in 1999, Stardust finished its main mission in 2006, sending a tiny sample of particles from the Wild 2 comet to Earth via a parachute-equipped canister.
Now that's just CRAZY: IT sent a canister of stuff back to earth... Can you imagine being the scientist who opened that canister?
At 4:41 p.m. MDT, Freund Kasper sent a command instructing Stardust to begin executing a set of instructions that had been transmitted to the probe earlier in the day.

About 42 minutes later — the time it took the command to travel the roughly 93 million miles to Stardust, and for Stardust's reply to reach Earth — the engineers' computer screens showed the burn was under way.
That's pretty flippin' fast... 42 minutes to cover 93 Million miles ... TWICE.

Thinking about turning it off and just letting it drift, I flashed on that Star Trek movie where they found "V-ger:" The Voyager satellite that had been turned off and wound up turning itself back on and forming itself into space intelligence.

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