Changing ecosystem concerns fisherman

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Parrotpaul
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Changing ecosystem concerns fisherman

Post by Parrotpaul » Sun Mar 10, 2013 6:34 am

The Gulf of Maine is heating up and acidifying. Scientists blame it on the ocean absorbing huge amounts of CO2. I'm reasonably sure there are those who will try to counter the claims set forth in this Portland Press Herald news article. It's scary to think about what's happening to the fishing industry in New England waters....not to mention other ocean waters around the world.

Changing ecosystem concerns fishermen

They're not alone: As Gulf of Maine waters become warmer and more acidic, scientists too worry about the implications for the region's fisheries.

By North Cairn ncairn@pressherald.com
Staff Writer


"We've seen levels of acid that rival some of the highest levels recorded anywhere," said professor of marine science Mark Green, whose work at St. Joseph's College in Standish has focused exclusively on ocean acidification. "Many coastal areas are increasing three times faster than open ocean."

Lobsters are up, cod down. The herring caught in the gulf are much smaller than they were 20 years ago, marine scientists have observed. Northern right whales might leave altogether if populations of plankton are reduced enough to affect the whales' food supply.

Ocean acidification is a long, slow process in which seas absorb excessive amounts of carbon dioxide, enough to alter pH levels (the percentage of hydrogen, which is a measure of acidity and alkalinity).

Global surface waters have an average pH of 8.1, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But scientists believe that level could drop in the next 50 years to as low as 7.8, a huge change.
"I think I may say that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education." John Locke

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Fordama
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Re: Changing ecosystem concerns fisherman

Post by Fordama » Sun Mar 10, 2013 7:43 am

Ah, the good ol' Carbon Cycle.

http://www.visionlearning.com/library/m ... php?mid=95

Fordama
This country of the United States was not built by those who waited and rested and wished to look behind them.---JFK

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kramer
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Re: Changing ecosystem concerns fisherman

Post by kramer » Sun Mar 10, 2013 2:58 pm

Parrotpaul wrote:The Gulf of Maine is heating up and acidifying. Scientists blame it on the ocean absorbing huge amounts of CO2. I'm reasonably sure there are those who will try to counter the claims set forth in this Portland Press Herald news article. It's scary to think about what's happening to the fishing industry in New England waters....not to mention other ocean waters around the world.

Changing ecosystem concerns fishermen

They're not alone: As Gulf of Maine waters become warmer and more acidic, scientists too worry about the implications for the region's fisheries.

By North Cairn ncairn@pressherald.com
Staff Writer


"We've seen levels of acid that rival some of the highest levels recorded anywhere," said professor of marine science Mark Green, whose work at St. Joseph's College in Standish has focused exclusively on ocean acidification. "Many coastal areas are increasing three times faster than open ocean."

Lobsters are up, cod down. The herring caught in the gulf are much smaller than they were 20 years ago, marine scientists have observed. Northern right whales might leave altogether if populations of plankton are reduced enough to affect the whales' food supply.

Ocean acidification is a long, slow process in which seas absorb excessive amounts of carbon dioxide, enough to alter pH levels (the percentage of hydrogen, which is a measure of acidity and alkalinity).

Global surface waters have an average pH of 8.1, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But scientists believe that level could drop in the next 50 years to as low as 7.8, a huge change.

1) Hey VP, how come you haven't told Paul yet that these kinds of environmental posts belong in the science forum and how come you haven't moved it there? Is it because liberals can get away with more on this board since it's run by a liberal?

2) Regarding the claim that it's getting warmer in the Maine gulf, the Atlantic Ocean is in a warm phase right now:
Image
From looking at the graph, I don't see evidence of it "heating up" any more than it has in the past 150 or so years.

Frequently Asked Questions About the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO)
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/amo_faq.php
“We should have been warned by the CFC/ozone affair because the corruption of science in that was so bad that something like 80% of the measurements being made during that time were either faked, or incompetently done.”

- Scientist James Lovelock

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Troglodyte
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Re: Changing ecosystem concerns fisherman

Post by Troglodyte » Sun Mar 10, 2013 5:07 pm

You've got to take the local conditions into consideration before you go all atwitter.
The 80% of Maine's elecrtical power production that doesn't use hydropower uses the ocean, rivers and streams for cooling purposes.
A good quarter of the state contains it's famous cranberry bogs, loaded with tannic acid.
Cod, herring, and sardines have been overfished for 500 years, which results in fewer and smaller fish. totally unrelated to "global warming".
An unscrupolous eco-wacko who wanted to "prove" his contention wouldn't resort to taking the readings just downstream from a power plant that is fed its' cooling water from a rained out bog, now would he??? .... :wink:
I don't suffer from any mental illnesses.. I enjoy them..

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Vilepagan
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Re: Changing ecosystem concerns fisherman

Post by Vilepagan » Mon Mar 11, 2013 3:15 am

kramer wrote:1) Hey VP, how come you haven't told Paul yet that these kinds of environmental posts belong in the science forum and how come you haven't moved it there? Is it because liberals can get away with more on this board since it's run by a liberal?
No, it's because it's already in the Science forum where it belongs.

Hey kramer, you know when you want to complain about me or the way this place is run you should do so in the "Board Business" forum, right?
There is no fire like passion, there is no shark like hatred, there is no snare like folly, there is no torrent like greed. - The Dhammapada

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Parrotpaul
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Re: Changing ecosystem concerns fisherman

Post by Parrotpaul » Mon Mar 11, 2013 6:30 am

Troglodyte wrote: A good quarter of the state contains it's famous cranberry bogs, loaded with tannic acid.
:wink:
No it doesn't. You do make things up as you go along... I'm calling you out on this one.

Show us your sources....or further reinforce your character to us.

FYI....you might want to do some research before blustering your way through a thread...remember your Canadian school system analysis source claiming it was an American situation? Naughty...naughty....

"Compared to wild blueberry production, the cultivation of cranberries in Maine is a cottage industry. Armstrong said there are only about 30 growers statewide, with most clustered in and around Washington County. Cranberry bogs in Maine range in size from one acre to six, and collectively, in 2011, there were just over 200 acres in production.

Armstrong said Maine growers are coming off a mediocre 2011 harvest. He estimates last year’s yield at 23,663 barrels, with each barrel representing 100 pounds of the tart berries. That’s down from 29,142 barrels in 2010 but up significantly from 18,000 barrels 10 years ago, an indicator of the expansion of the industry.

“The last harvest was sort of boom or bust, a tale-of-two-cities situation,” he said. “There were two growers around Augusta who had bumper crops, with yields of about 261 barrels per acre. Other growers saw their yields down, in some cases because of a lot of pruning being done after the 2010 harvest, which is similar to burning blueberry plants. It’s sort of a mechanical haircut for the vines, and the cuttings are used to seed new vines.”

Armstrong said the 2011 harvest also was affected by the Passamaquoddy nation’s decision to take 19 acres of bogs out of production in Down East Maine.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates the 2011 cranberry harvest nationally to be 7.5 million barrels, which makes Maine’s 23,600 barrels nominal. Wisconsin’s harvest was estimated at 4.3 million barrels, followed by 2.1 million for Massachusetts and 540,000 for New Jersey."


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"I think I may say that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education." John Locke

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Troglodyte
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Re: Changing ecosystem concerns fisherman

Post by Troglodyte » Mon Mar 11, 2013 3:37 pm

A look at a map of Maine shows an awful lot of boggy looking lakes. Maybe you "Down Easters" are not as industrious as advertized. :wink: Shallow slow moving lakes collect a lot of leaves and plant debris which creates tannic acid. cranberries not required..
I don't suffer from any mental illnesses.. I enjoy them..

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