Windows 7

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Parrotpaul
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Windows 7

Post by Parrotpaul »

Sorry...no link..this was Emailed to me.

October 22, 2009

State of the Art
Windows 7 Keeps the Good, Tries to Fix Flaws



By DAVID POGUE
Windows 7 comes out Thursday. And if the programmers at Microsoft have any
strength left at all, they are high-fiving.

Their three-year Windows Vista nightmare is over. That operating system's
wretched reputation may have been overblown; at the outset, it was slow,
intrusive and incompatible with a lot of gadgets, but it's been quietly
improved over the years. Nonetheless, the corporate software buyers who
order copies of Windows by the gross weren't impressed. As recently as this
summer, at least two-thirds of corporate computers were still running the
positively ancient Windows XP.

Windows 7 is a different story. It keeps what's good about Windows Vista,
like security, stability and generous eye candy, and addresses much of what
people disliked.

Item 1: Sluggishness. As Microsoft's triple redundancy puts it, Windows 7
offers "faster, more responsive performance."

Item 2: Hardware requirements. They're no steeper than Vista's three years
ago (the standard edition requires 1 gigabyte of memory and 1 gigahertz
processor; more is better).

Item 3: Nagging Windows 7 is far less alarmist than Vista, which freaked out
about every potential security threat. In fact, 10 categories of warnings
now pile up quietly in a single, unified Action Center and don't interrupt
you at all.

Best of all, Windows 7 represents a departure from Microsoft's usual
"success is measured by the length of the feature list" philosophy. This
time around, it was, "Polish, optimize and streamline what we've already
got." That seems to be the industry mantra for 2009 - see also Apple's Snow
Leopard release in August - and it's fantastic news. There are three ugly
aspects of Windows 7, so let's get them out of the way up front. Upgrading
from Vista is easy, but upgrading from Windows XP involves a "clean
install"- moving all your programs and files off the hard drive, installing
Windows 7, then copying everything back on again. It's an all-day hassle
that's nobody's idea of fun.

Microsoft doesn't think XP holdouts will bother; it hopes that they'll just
get Windows 7 preinstalled on a new PC. (It's no accident that new operating
systems come out right before holiday shopping.) The second bit of nastiness
is the insane matrix of versions. Again, there are five versions of Windows
7 - Starter, Home Premium, Professional, Enterprise, Ultimate - each with
its own set of features, each in 32-bit or 64-bit flavors (except Starter),
at prices from $120 to $320. Good luck figuring out why some cool Windows 7
feature, like the much-improved, TiVo-like Windows Media Center, isn't on
your PC.

(No wonder a raft of books about Windows 7 is on the way. A disclosure: I'm
writing one of them.)

Finally, out of fear of antitrust headaches, Microsoft has stripped Windows
7 of some important accessory programs. Believe it or not, software for
managing photos, editing videos, reading PDF documents, maintaining a
calendar, managing addresses, chatting online or writing e-mail doesn't come
with Windows 7.

What kind of operating system doesn't come with an e-mail program?

Instead, you're supposed to download these free apps yourself from a
Microsoft Web site. It's not a huge deal; some companies, including Dell,
plan to preinstall them on new computers. But a lot of people will be in for
some serious confusion - especially when they discover that the Windows 7
installer has deleted their existing Vista copies of Windows Mail, Movie
Maker, Calendar, Contacts and Photo Gallery. (Mercifully, it preserves your
data.)

Otherwise, though, Windows 7 is mostly great news. The happiest developments
help Windows live up to its name: there are some slick, efficient new
features for managing windows.

You can drag a window's edge against the top or side of your screen to make
it fill the whole screen or half of it. You can give a window a little shake
with the mouse - kind of fun, actually - to minimize all other windows (or
to bring them back again) when you need a quick look at your desktop.

The taskbar now resembles the Dock in Apple's Mac OS X. That is, it displays
the icons for both open programs and those you've dragged there for quick
access. (Weirdly, though, you can't turn individual folders and documents
into buttons on the taskbar, as in Mac OS X, only programs.)

Better yet, if you point to a program's icon without clicking, you see
Triscuit-size miniatures of all the windows open in that program. And if you
point to one of these thumbnails, its corresponding full-size window flashes
to the fore. All of this means easier navigation in a screen awash with
window clutter.

Windows 7 also introduces libraries: virtual folders that display the
contents of up to 50 other folders, which may be scattered all over your
system. Libraries make it easy to keep project files together, back them up
en masse or share them with other PC's on the network.

Speaking of which, networking is also more refined in Windows 7. Handling of
Internet hot spots is much better than before, and the new HomeGroups
feature lets you unify all Windows 7 computers and printers on your home
network without having to mess with accounts or permissions. You just enter
the same long, one-time password on each machine. (Only at Microsoft do
"user-friendly" and "write down this password: E6fQ9UX3uR" appear in the
same sentence.) Once that's done, each computer can see the photos, music
and documents on all the other ones. It's a little buggy, but it'll get
there.

Compatibility is excellent. I connected a couple dozen cameras, phones,
iPods, printers and scanners, and Windows 7 recognized them all. Recent,
brand-name apps fare well, too, but there are no guarantees. I found a
couple of smaller, older programs that wouldn't work in Windows 7.

Some Windows 7 developments fall under the heading, "If you build it, they
might come... eventually." For example, the updated Windows Media Player
program can now send music playback to another gadget on your network: an
Xbox, digital picture frame, another Windows 7 machine and so on. The catch:
the other gadget has to be D.L.N.A.-certified, which you're supposed to know
refers to an industry compatibility standard.

Or take the new Device Stage screen. When you connect a gadget to your PC,
you're supposed to see its actual photograph, model name and list of
relevant features. But until all the gadget makers get on board, you
sometimes see only generic icons here.

Even the multitouch feature of Windows 7 falls into that hit-or-miss
category. On new laptops and even desktop PCs with multitouch screens, you
can drag two fingers on the screen to rotate photos, scroll and zoom,
exactly the way you do on an iPhone.

Alas, software programs have to be rewritten to understand these gestures;
for example, they all work in Microsoft's Photo Gallery, but only the zoom
gesture works in Google's Picasa. You're in for many "Doh!" moments as you
realize you've reached out awkwardly with your arm, dragged around on the
touch screen, and produced nothing but gross grease streaks.

Now, Windows 7 is still Windows. It's still copy-protected, it still
requires antivirus software and its visuals still aren't consistent from one
corner to another.

On the other hand, it's still Windows in a good way, too, meaning that it's
your ticket to a world of choice - a huge catalog of software and computer
options. This Win is a win if you're in the market for a new machine, or if
you're running Vista now and you're not thrilled by it.

Above all, Windows 7 means that Microsoft employees can show up in public
without avoiding eye contact. Looks like 7 is a lucky number after all.



Home
Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company
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GOODave
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Re: Windows 7

Post by GOODave »

Here you go.

My "google" isn't broken.
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Logic.in.LN
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Re: Windows 7

Post by Logic.in.LN »

Parrotpaul wrote:Sorry...no link..this was Emailed to me.

October 22, 2009
State of the Art
Windows 7 Keeps the Good, Tries to Fix Flaws



By DAVID POGUE
Windows 7 comes out Thursday. And if the programmers at Microsoft have any
strength left at all, they are high-fiving.


...There are three ugly aspects of Windows 7, so let's get them out of the way up front. Upgrading from Vista is easy, but upgrading from Windows XP involves a "clean install"- moving all your programs and files off the hard drive, installing Windows 7, then copying everything back on again. It's an all-day hassle that's nobody's idea of fun.

Microsoft doesn't think XP holdouts will bother; it hopes that they'll just get Windows 7 preinstalled on a new PC. (It's no accident that new operating systems come out right before holiday shopping.) The second bit of nastiness is the insane matrix of versions. Again, there are five versions of Windows 7 - Starter, Home Premium, Professional, Enterprise, Ultimate - each with its own set of features, each in 32-bit or 64-bit flavors (except Starter), at prices from $120 to $320. Good luck figuring out why some cool Windows 7 feature, like the much-improved, TiVo-like Windows Media Center, isn't on your PC.

(No wonder a raft of books about Windows 7 is on the way. A disclosure: I'm writing one of them.)

Finally, out of fear of antitrust headaches, Microsoft has stripped Windows 7 of some important accessory programs. Believe it or not, software for managing photos, editing videos, reading PDF documents, maintaining a calendar, managing addresses, chatting online or writing e-mail doesn't come with Windows 7.
Windows 7 will certainly be a breath of fresh air compared to Vista and the reviews so far are positive on the whole. However, the clean install requirement will keep many people from upgrading until they buy a new computer. Who really wants to go through that hassle when XP works well enough on that computer you bought last year.

People on Vista are more likely to upgrade since they already might understand the differences in all the versions and can upgrade without reformatting the hard drive first. However, they will still need to download all the extra programs separately. Again, this will scare off alot of typical consumers.

We will see where sales are in a few weeks. It will be telling if the software is selling or only new machines are selling. Microsoft shows their lack of concern for consumers by assuming that you will buy a new machine just to get their new software. :roll:
"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former”
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Parrotpaul
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Re: Windows 7

Post by Parrotpaul »

Logic.in.LN wrote: Windows 7 will certainly be a breath of fresh air compared to Vista and the reviews so far are positive on the whole. However, the clean install requirement will keep many people from upgrading until they buy a new computer. Who really wants to go through that hassle when XP works well enough on that computer you bought last year.

People on Vista are more likely to upgrade since they already might understand the differences in all the versions and can upgrade without reformatting the hard drive first. However, they will still need to download all the extra programs separately. Again, this will scare off alot of typical consumers.

We will see where sales are in a few weeks. It will be telling if the software is selling or only new machines are selling. Microsoft shows their lack of concern for consumers by assuming that you will buy a new machine just to get their new software. :roll:
We have a PC and a laptop with the latest Vista and a PC and a laptop with XP. Once you get used to Vista, it isn't all that bad, but we will not be updating any of them.

The two XP computers are fine for most applications, but the higher DRAM Vista machines are much better at playing on-line games....mucho faster.
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Logic.in.LN
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Re: Windows 7

Post by Logic.in.LN »

Parrotpaul wrote: We have a PC and a laptop with the latest Vista and a PC and a laptop with XP. Once you get used to Vista, it isn't all that bad, but we will not be updating any of them.

The two XP computers are fine for most applications, but the higher DRAM Vista machines are much better at playing on-line games....mucho faster.
As a case study, you prove my point. The hassle of upgrading to Windows 7 along with the price is not worth the effort.

I run Mac OS X 10.3 on a mini and XP on a PC in the office and OS X 10.5 with XP through VMware on an iMac at home. I upgraded recently to 10.5 from 10.4 on the iMac more because I wanted the latest iLife suite (photo, video, etc...). I got the OS, iLife, and Works suite (mac version of office) as a bundle for $169 instead of $289 separately. Much cheaper than a Windows 7 upgrade since you don't get the office package included.

The upgrade to about 5-10 minutes to start and then periodic checks over an hour or so while it loaded plus about an hour of precaution beforehand where I backed up critical data - just in case. All in all a quick and painless procedure.
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18echo
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Re: Windows 7

Post by 18echo »

Linux is still free and is still faster than Windoze.
Open Office 3.1 is free and Office 2007 compatible.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by John Q. Public »

Parrotpaul wrote: We have a PC and a laptop with the latest Vista and a PC and a laptop with XP. Once you get used to Vista, it isn't all that bad, but we will not be updating any of them.

The two XP computers are fine for most applications, but the higher DRAM Vista machines are much better at playing on-line games....mucho faster.
So, it's safe to assume you won't be hosting a Window 7 party?

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Re: Windows 7

Post by GOODave »

An article I was reading said Windows 7 is approaching marked similarity to Mac's Leopard 10 platform, particularly with the "docking" over the "task manager" concept.

If that is true and assuming everything pre or post "Service Pack 1" works out, I wouldn't object to returning to Windows.

For now, though, I'm happy with Leopard.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by Logic.in.LN »

GOODave wrote:An article I was reading said Windows 7 is approaching marked similarity to Mac's Leopard 10 platform, particularly with the "docking" over the "task manager" concept.

If that is true and assuming everything pre or post "Service Pack 1" works out, I wouldn't object to returning to Windows.

For now, though, I'm happy with Leopard.
Of course why not stick with or switch to the innovator instead of waiting for the emulator to keep chasing your coat tails. After all MS has been promising great things for years. :mrgreen:

[youtube][/youtube]

And since it is easier to buy new than upgrade to Windows 7, why not just switch to the Mac... =D>

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18echo
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Re: Windows 7

Post by 18echo »

Review: Ubuntu 9.10 v Windows 7
http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/bl ... ws7-review

It's what's been running the Wiki servers;
http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news ... ucture.ars
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Re: Windows 7

Post by AsIfYouKnew »

18echo wrote:Linux is still free and is still faster than Windoze.
Open Office 3.1 is free and Office 2007 compatible.
Not enough games on Linux.

Been running Windows 7 for a little more than a month. Works great, faster than vista.
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Re: Windows 7

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AsIfYouKnew wrote: Not enough games on Linux.

Been running Windows 7 for a little more than a month. Works great, faster than vista.
Eh...I keep an XP partition for the last PC version of Madden NFL, and I haven't really had time to play that since getting back from overseas.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by Donray »

Starting my upgrade from Vista to Windows 7. Bought the Windows 7 upgrade software for $50 during the pre release sale from COSTCO. Will be doing a clean install using the upgrade disks. Hope I have everything backed up on a removable drive. Will be starting a format on the hard drive as soon as I send this message.

Will let you know when I get back up and how it went.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by THe Nug »

I keep seeing all these Windows 7 ads on TV. Yesterday my television crashed. Please advise.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by GOODave »

THe Nug wrote:I keep seeing all these Windows 7 ads on TV. Yesterday my television crashed. Please advise.
Oh good... that's a relief.

I thought I might have been speaking over your head with all that "expectations" stuff. I'm glad to see you understood what I was saying all along.

Carry on.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by Donray »

Clean upgrade to Windows 7 was easy. I must be one of the few people that had no problems with Vista. Never had a virus or a lot of problems with any version of Windows.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by SoMelo »

Donray wrote:Clean upgrade to Windows 7 was easy. I must be one of the few people that had no problems with Vista. Never had a virus or a lot of problems with any version of Windows.
I've never had any problems with Vista, other than not being able to respond to work emails with it (but that's my companies issues). I'm buying my younger son a laptop so having Windows 7 pre-loaded will be okay?
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Re: Windows 7

Post by AsIfYouKnew »

SoMelo wrote: I've never had any problems with Vista, other than not being able to respond to work emails with it (but that's my companies issues). I'm buying my younger son a laptop so having Windows 7 pre-loaded will be okay?
Should be fine. I have windows 7 at home now and have had it for a month. no issues at all.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by kramer »

GOODave wrote:An article I was reading said Windows 7 is approaching marked similarity to Mac's Leopard 10 platform, particularly with the "docking" over the "task manager" concept.
It's no surprise:
"One of the things that people say an awful lot about the Apple Mac is that the OS is fantastic, that it’s very graphical and easy to use. What we’ve tried to do with Windows 7 – whether it’s traditional format or in a touch format – is create a Mac look and feel in terms of graphics."

-Simon Aldous, Microsoft partner group manager, Nov 11, '09

http://www.pcr-online.biz/features/328/ ... new-vision
Apple is Microsoft's R&D center.

Heck, they've even copied the Apple stores. My younger son was at the MV mall the other day and came home saying it was practically the same as an Apple store, even in the clothes they wear and the necklace employe ID cards they have on them.

And the opening was like an Apple store opening with a "grand" opening with a line out the door (that was guaranteed to be there because Microsoft ran an add in the Sunday paper promising tickets to a rock show and other goodies) and then the workers 'cheering' the people walking in the store.

It's sickening that a company with over 90% of the computer market share has to copy Apple.
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Re: Windows 7

Post by Logic.in.LN »

kramer wrote:
It's no surprise:



Apple is Microsoft's R&D center.

Heck, they've even copied the Apple stores. My younger son was at the MV mall the other day and came home saying it was practically the same as an Apple store, even in the clothes they wear and the necklace employe ID cards they have on them.

And the opening was like an Apple store opening with a "grand" opening with a line out the door (that was guaranteed to be there because Microsoft ran an add in the Sunday paper promising tickets to a rock show and other goodies) and then the workers 'cheering' the people walking in the store.

It's sickening that a company with over 90% of the computer market share has to copy Apple.
Apple stores have geniuses and Microsoft stores have gurus. I don't see any similarity here. :wink:
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