Biggest Historical Misconceptions

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Charles
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Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by Charles » Sat Sep 10, 2011 3:10 pm

Abner Doubleday Invented Baseball
Witches were burnt in Salem
Lizzie Borden took an axe…
Edison Invented the Lightbulb
Betsy Ross inventing the American flag
Our revolution was about taxes. It had every bit as much to do with the power to print our own money.
Napoleon Bonaparte was short. He stood 5'7" which was an average height for European men in the late 18th and early 19th Centuries.
Founding Fathers were Christians intent on forming a Christian nation. Most,including GW,were Deists.Thomas Jefferson wrote his own version of the Bible taking out most of the Christian stuff. Ben Franklin did not believe in the divinity of Christ.
Christopher Columbus discovered America, or set sail to prove the Earth was round
Nero fiddled as Rome burned.
Cass Elliot choked to death on a ham sandwich
South Africa was populated by Black Africans before Europeans got there and took the land away from them
The Civil War was mainly about slavery when it was really about slavery and taxation/tariffs unfairly levied on southern states and businesses..
FDR's New Deal pulled the United States out of the Great Depression

Others?

joefutbol
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Re: Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by joefutbol » Sat Sep 10, 2011 3:24 pm

The inaccurate accounts of the Boston Massacre and Boston Tea Party.

I'm pretty sure blacks populated South Africa long before whites.

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Troglodyte
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Re: Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by Troglodyte » Sat Sep 10, 2011 5:24 pm

joefutbol wrote:I'm pretty sure blacks populated South Africa long before whites.
Nope... A small band of pigmies arrived several years after the Boers, to see what was going on and if they could get some trading going.. Before that nothing...
NO!!!!.gif
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joefutbol
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Re: Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by joefutbol » Sat Sep 10, 2011 5:32 pm

Troglodyte wrote: Nope... A small band of pigmies arrived several years after the Boers, to see what was going on and if they could get some trading going.. Before that nothing...
NO!!!!.gif
The Khoisan (sp?) were there long before that.

Luca
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Re: Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by Luca » Sat Sep 10, 2011 6:51 pm

Charles wrote: Founding Fathers were Christians intent on forming a Christian nation. Most,including GW,were Deists.Thomas Jefferson wrote his own version of the Bible taking out most of the Christian stuff. Ben Franklin did not believe in the divinity of Christ......

The Civil War was mainly about slavery when it was really about slavery and taxation/tariffs unfairly levied on southern states and businesses.
The 1st misconception has a few components to it. When you say that "most" of the founding fathers were Deists, I think that's a debatable statement. In the first place I doubt there's any reliable record on the religious beliefs of the majority of them and, in the second, it depends on whom you include as "Founding Fathers," since that's a rather ill-defined group. I had never heard of the concept of the intent of forming a "Christian nation" before the last few decades. I'm not aware that was anybody's specific intent, either.

That second misconception is not a "misconception" at all. The Civil War was about slavery. Apologists for the South will often bring up morally neutral issues such as tariffs and "states rights",etc, but no nation has ever fought a Civil War over something as minor as tariffs, to my knowledge. Slavery was the sine qua non as the cause of the Civil War. Without slavery it is unlikely there would have been a war no matter what the tariffs or tax rates were. Luca

Luca
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Re: Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by Luca » Sat Sep 10, 2011 6:55 pm

Troglodyte wrote: Nope... A small band of pigmies arrived several years after the Boers, to see what was going on and if they could get some trading going.. Before that nothing...
NO!!!!.gif
It wasn't the pygmies, Troglodyte. It was the Fukowis. They are often confused because they are likewise very small. The story is that they initially migrated into South Africa where the glass lands stand much taller than they do in Central Africa. That's how they got their name, in fact. They would wander aimlessly in these tall grasslands asking each other "Where the fuk ow we?" Luca

pshaw
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Re: Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by pshaw » Sat Sep 10, 2011 7:41 pm

Troglodyte wrote: Nope... A small band of pigmies arrived several years after the Boers, to see what was going on and if they could get some trading going.. Before that nothing...
Maybe you should submit your research to Wikipedia so they can correct their error:

"Modern humans have inhabited Southern Africa for at least 170,000 years. At the time of European contact, the dominant indigenous peoples were Bantu-speaking peoples who had migrated from other parts of Africa about one thousand years before. The two major historic groups were the Xhosa and Zulu peoples."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Africa

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oceanvue
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Re: Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by oceanvue » Sun Sep 11, 2011 8:41 am

I always thought that if Mama Cass would have given Karen Carpenter her sandwich they both would be alive today
Image

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Troglodyte
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Re: Biggest Historical Misconceptions

Post by Troglodyte » Sun Sep 11, 2011 9:07 am

pshaw wrote: Maybe you should submit your research to Wikipedia so they can correct their error:

"Modern humans have inhabited Southern Africa for at least 170,000 years. At the time of European contact, the dominant indigenous peoples were Bantu-speaking peoples who had migrated from other parts of Africa about one thousand years before. The two major historic groups were the Xhosa and Zulu peoples."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Africa
Well there you have it... four different answers to the same question.. The reality is the Boers moved in and there was nobody there to oppose them... :wink:
You might be refering to the Voortrekers, who went beyond the original boundaries of the Cape Colony and first encountered resistance from the natives.


http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/top ... n-Riebeeck
Jan van Riebeeck, in full Jan Anthoniszoon Van Riebeeck (born April 21, 1619, Culemborg, Neth.—died Jan. 18, 1677, Batavia, Dutch East Indies [now Jakarta, Indon.]), Dutch colonial administrator who founded (1652) Cape Town and thus opened Southern Africa for white settlement.
Van Riebeeck joined the Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oost-indische Compagnie; commonly called VOC) as an assistant surgeon and sailed to Batavia in April 1639. From there he went to Japan; in 1645 he took charge of the company trading station at Tongking (Tonkin; now in Vietnam). He was dismissed, having defied the ban on private trading, but was reinstated to command an expedition to the Cape of Good Hope (at the tip of Southern Africa) to build a fort and establish a provisioning station for ships traveling to East India. His expedition arrived in Table Bay on April 6, 1652, but work on the fort was slow because of crop failures and disorderliness. Van Riebeeck reported in 1655 that his mission would fail unless free burghers, working their own farms, were introduced. Accordingly, in 1657, former company servants were granted “letters of freedom” that protected company interests. Van Riebeeck also encouraged the importation of slaves and exploration of the interior. Van Riebeeck made the first—and futile—attempts to restrict the movement of white settlers beyond the Cape Peninsula, but white encroachments on the land of the Khoekhoe people led to war in 1659–60, the first of many. When van Riebeeck left the Cape in 1662, the settlement there had more than 100 colonists.
I don't suffer from any mental illnesses.. I enjoy them..

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