Pain Culture and Opioids

broman
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Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby broman » Fri Mar 29, 2019 4:30 pm

Trying to figure understand how some many people through legal means got addicted to opioids and why it had a greater impact on

In the late 1990s, pharmaceutical companies reassured the medical community that patients would not become addicted to prescription opioid pain relievers, and healthcare providers began to prescribe them at greater rates. This subsequently led to widespread diversion and misuse of these medications before it became clear that these medications could indeed be highly addictive.3,4 Opioid overdose rates began to increase. In 2017, more than 47,000 Americans died as a result of an opioid overdose, including prescription opioids, heroin, and illicitly manufactured fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid.1 That same year, an estimated 1.7 million people in the United States suffered from substance use disorders related to prescription opioid pain relievers, and 652,000 suffered from a heroin use disorder

While affecting people across race and ethnicity, the opioid crisis gripping the nation has been concentrated largely among low-income whites, and has been labeled a problem primarily of public health, not of criminal justice. The epidemic is thought to have been touched off by a combination of social factors – including trauma, poverty and a lack of economic opportunity – and the widespread availability of prescription opioids beginning in the 1990s.

“The prescription drug crisis should really be thought of as a double-sided epidemic,” says Joseph Friedman, the study’s lead author and a medical student at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “Essentially, the systematic racism within the health care system has led to increased addiction and overdoses in low-income white areas, but also, (to) insufficient treatment among communities of color.”
https://www.usnews.com/news/healthiest- ... y-suggests

Some states are suing the opioids manufacturers, but reads like some deep rooted cultural issues. :eh?:



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John Q. Public
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby John Q. Public » Fri Mar 29, 2019 6:06 pm

Problem #1 was that it was originally marketed as being no more addictive than codeine. Even the name "Oxycodone" was chosen to make it seem that way. Doctors only knew what their reps told them until people like Rush Limbaugh started going into treatment to get off it. Why they continued to prescribe it in such high numbers is another question.

Interesting, too, that the reasons why it hasn't affected people of color as much are lack of medical coverage, distrust of medications and various other cultural reasons like alternative treatments, alternative medications and people saying "Aw, it isn't so bad. It'll go away" that aren't as prevalent among whites.

Another factor skewing the numbers toward lower income brackets is simply that the people more likely to get hurt are the ones doing the work. Simple as that.
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John Q. Public
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby John Q. Public » Fri Mar 29, 2019 6:27 pm

Another factor that makes opioids attractive to the white trash community, as I understand it, is that like heroin they make the user feel really good (not so much really stoned, but just really... good) and they give them the sense that all is right with the world. What better market for that than laid-off factory workers and the like?
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Luca
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby Luca » Fri Mar 29, 2019 6:40 pm

A few points:

It’s called oxycodone because its the same molecule as hydrocodone except that there is a hydroxyl substituted for a hydrogen atom at one of the benzene rings. That is the descriptive chemical name as there was no conspiracy behind it.

No competent physician would believe a semi-educated drug rep telling him that ANY opiate is “nonaddictive.”

‘Doctors only knew what their drug reps told them” is ludicrous. That sounds like it came straight from a personal injury lawyer. Obviously it was known to be addictive. Any drug rep who would have stated otherwise would have been told to get the hell out of my office and never come back.

Opiates are addictive and have been known to be so since Edgar Allan Poe. They were Prescribed for pain control, a subset of patients got addicted and so now the impetus is to use non opiate drugs to control pain. There’s not all that much drama to the story................Luca

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John Q. Public
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby John Q. Public » Fri Mar 29, 2019 6:58 pm

If you read about Purdue's early marketing of it there's a whole lot of drama.
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Wabash
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby Wabash » Fri Mar 29, 2019 7:44 pm

When crack was ravaging the inner cities no one seemed to care. In fact there was a mindset that anyone addicted was a common criminal and should be incarcerated.

Now that opioids are ravaging the suburbs we're told it is a crisis and those "victims" should be treated from a medical perspective.

Rush Limbaugh's experience with breaking the law is yet another example of the double standard of justice that exists for the wealthy versus the poor.
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby John Q. Public » Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:19 pm

Do you have something constructive to add or are you just here to troll?
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Wabash
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby Wabash » Sat Mar 30, 2019 3:31 am

I guess you missed my point. All of a sudden we are told about this huge epidemic. As if though nothing like this ever happened before. Which is not the case. We've had drug epidemics in large portions of our population for some time.

Before it was a criminal issue. Now that it is affecting the suburbs, we are told it is a medical issue.

What is the major difference between those abusing drugs in the cities, and those in the suburbs?

I just can't get too worked up over this new drug crisis when there has been similar crises around for decades.
They told me if I voted for Hillary Clinton the president would be emotional, impulsive, and unpredictable. They were right. I voted for Hillary Clinton and got a president that is emotional, impulsive, and unpredictable.

broman
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby broman » Sat Mar 30, 2019 8:34 am

broman wrote:Source of the post combination of social factors – including trauma, poverty and a lack of economic opportunity – and the widespread availability of prescription opioids beginning in the 1990s.


Here is the disconnect for me. States like Michigan are dealing with the trauma the article describes above. Connecting this to what we heard at the political rally the other day. Pencil neck geek, AOC sucks, and Trump bragging about his apartment and house size. Should they not be looking for serious polices to make their community whole and not another pep rally?

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John Q. Public
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby John Q. Public » Sat Mar 30, 2019 9:04 am

Wabash wrote:Source of the post What is the major difference between those abusing drugs in the cities, and those in the suburbs?

Biggest difference? They weren't taking them to get high.

Next biggest difference? Opioids are highly and physically addictive; crack not so much on either count.

The rest of your post was on the level of "But her emails!" and I thought seriously about deleting for being off-topic.
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Luca
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby Luca » Sat Mar 30, 2019 9:22 am

It’s probably better to view it not so much trolling as comic relief..............Luca

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ShiftyMutt
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby ShiftyMutt » Sat Mar 30, 2019 11:42 am

Way more support and research needs to be done on Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN). It has great feedback on pain, autoimmune disease and other issues.

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Wabash
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Re: Pain Culture and Opioids

Postby Wabash » Sat Mar 30, 2019 2:51 pm

John Q. Public wrote:Biggest difference? They weren't taking them to get high.

You really believe none of the opioid use in the suburbs is recreational?

I doubt that.

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